Tuesday, October 4

Tag: WASH

Pentagon chief: Too soon to say who might be behind Nord Stream pipeline ruptures

Pentagon chief: Too soon to say who might be behind Nord Stream pipeline ruptures

News
WASHINGTON, Sept 29 (Reuters) - U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said on Thursday it was still too soon to speculate who might have been behind the Nord Stream pipeline ruptures."In terms of the attack - or the damage to the pipeline, at this point I think there's a lot of speculation. But quite frankly, until a complete investigation is done, no one will be able to really determine for certain what happened," Austin told a news conference in Hawaii.Austin added that he discussed the incident with his Danish counterpart on Wednesday, "and he pointed out to me that it will be several days before he's able to get the right team in to look at the sites and really try to determine as best possible what happened.""Until we get further information, or are able to do further analysis, we wo...
U.S. student loan relief to cost $30 bln a year over next decade, government says

U.S. student loan relief to cost $30 bln a year over next decade, government says

News
WASHINGTON, Sept 29 (Reuters) - The U.S. Education Department said on Thursday it estimates that the one-time student debt relief plan given by President Joe Biden in August will cost an average of $30 billion a year over the next decade.The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) said this week that Biden's plan to cancel some student loan debt will cost $400 billion.Biden said in August the U.S. government will forgive $10,000 in student loans for millions of debt-saddled former college students, keeping a pledge he made in the 2020 campaign for the White House.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegisterReporting by Costas Pitas; writing by Kanishka SinghOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. Source link
Palestinians say boy dies of heart failure during chase by Israeli troops

Palestinians say boy dies of heart failure during chase by Israeli troops

News
JERUSALEM, Sept 29 (Reuters) - A Palestinian boy died of heart failure while being chased by Israeli soldiers in the occupied West Bank on Thursday, his father said, an account disputed by the army while Washington voiced sorrow at the incident and encouraged an investigation.Seven-year-old Rayyan Suleiman was coming home from school with other pupils in the village of Tuqu when troops gave chase, and he "died on the spot from fear," his father Yasser said in a video circulated on social media.A medical official who inspected the body told Reuters that it bore no sign of physical trauma and that the death appeared consistent with heart failure. The Palestinian Foreign Ministry condemned the incident as "an ugly crime" by Israel.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegist...
World Bank to discuss in October replacement for ‘Doing Business’ reports

World Bank to discuss in October replacement for ‘Doing Business’ reports

News
WASHINGTON, Sept 28 (Reuters) - The World Bank's board will discuss plans next month for replacing the bank's flagship "Doing Business" rankings that were canceled in September 2021 after an external report found data irregularities, World Bank President David Malpass said.Malpass told an event hosted by Stanford University on Wednesday there were still issues to define how to assess a country's business climate, but the bank and its various arms, including the International Finance Corp, were all working to continue encouraging private sector activity."The World Bank is very involved in trying to encourage private sector development in countries," he said.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegisterThe World Bank in February said it is working on a new approach, tentat...
U.S. Supreme Court to continue audio live stream of arguments

U.S. Supreme Court to continue audio live stream of arguments

Entertainment
Sept 28 (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court said on Wednesday it will continue providing a live audio feed of its arguments during its new term that begins on Oct. 3, maintaining a feature it adopted in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the closure of its courtroom.The top U.S. judicial body, faulted by critics for a lack of transparency in its operations, opted to keep providing the live audio to the public even as it continues to prohibit any video coverage of its proceedings.Early in the pandemic, the court closed its doors to the public and changed the way it operated in a bid to combat the spread of the coronavirus.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegisterIn May 2020, it began hearing oral arguments by teleconference, instead of in person, with a live audi...
‘Where’s Jackie?’ Biden seeks lawmaker Walorski who died in August

‘Where’s Jackie?’ Biden seeks lawmaker Walorski who died in August

News
WASHINGTON, Sept 28 (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden publicly sought out Jackie Walorski, an Indiana Congresswoman who died in a car accident in August, during a conference on hunger on Wednesday, seeming to forget that she had passed away.Biden thanked other conference organizers, then asked: "Jackie are you here? Where's Jackie?"Walorski, a Republican, was one of four Congressional co-sponsors of the bill to fund the conference. She was killed with two staffers in early August.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegisterBiden moved past the issue without any correction. After Walorski's death, the White House issued a statement from Biden that said he and his wife Jill were "shocked and saddened" by her sudden accident."Truly an awful and disgraceful blunder," Rep...
U.S. pace of sanctions on Russia to continue, focus on finance, technology

U.S. pace of sanctions on Russia to continue, focus on finance, technology

News
WASHINGTON, Sept 28 (Reuters) - The United States is working with allies and partners to quickly impose severe economic costs on Moscow over "sham" referendums held by Russia in occupied regions of Ukraine, according to prepared remarks from the U.S. State Department's head of sanctions coordination on Wednesday.James O'Brien, in testimony prepared for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said he expects that the Biden administration's pace of announcing sanctions on Russia on average every six weeks will continue, as Washington continues to focus on choke points in the Russian economy and its military supply chains."There will be more packages. We are working on more sanctions," O'Brien told the committee.Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.comRegister"Everything is on...